Manager's Guide to Contingency Planning for Disasters: Protecting Vital Facilities and Critical Operations

Manager's Guide to Contingency Planning for Disasters: Protecting Vital Facilities and Critical Operations

Manager's Guide to Contingency Planning for Disasters: Protecting Vital Facilities and Critical Operations

Manager's Guide to Contingency Planning for Disasters: Protecting Vital Facilities and Critical Operations

Synopsis

With the help of an implementation strategy, guidelines for minimizing development costs, and insight into a proven plan development methodology, Manager's Guide to Contingency Planning for Disasters: Protecting Vital Facilities and Critical Operations helps you to:
• Establish a corporate contingency plan policy and strategy that will ensure timely completion of a plan with minimal disruption to operations.
• Minimize plan development costs
• Understand the importance of conducting briefings to communicate the proper mindset before the plan development process begins.
• Save time and money by avoiding the consultant's traditional approach of extensive information-gathering that contributes little to the development of practical solutions
Remember that you have good people on your management team who don't need a lot of detailed instruction on how to do things in an emergency situation. Precisely "how" they do anything will depend on the specific nature of the disaster and the extent of the damage. Addressing complex hypothetical disaster combinations does not make good business sense. Just prepare "what if" strategies for a worst case and rely on the judgment of your line managers to cope with less severe incidents.

Excerpt

Manager’s Guide to Contingency Planning for Disasters describes why “what if” business continuity strategies are sufficient given the low probability of a disaster; and that developing detailed scenarios and procedures are a waste of time and money.

Developing a contingency plan is not crossing every “t” and dotting every “i” or preparing detailed “weigh it by the pound” reports that are the hallmark of most consulting firms. It does not require an involved “business impact analysis” to gain consensus on the relative criticality of different business functions. Manager’s Guide explains that what is “critical” under normal operating conditions when all systems are operational and what is “critical” at the time a disaster happens differ depending on what options are available following a disaster to maintain business continuity.

Developing a contingency plan is not preparing individual scenarios and responses for different types of disasters, nor is it itemizing different responses based on the expected duration of the interruption. Manager’s Guide recommends that only a “worst-case” scenario be used in developing “what if” business continuity strategies, with the understanding that less serious conditions could reasonably be expected to be handled within this framework.

Developing a contingency plan is not spending thousands of dollars for a plan development process that lasts several months and takes valuable time from line managers. Manager’s Guide suggests an approach anchored in a practical corporate contingency plan policy and strategy, and emphasizes survival rather than “business as usual” following a disaster.

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