History of the Communist Party of Great Britain: Formation and Early Years, 1919-1924 - Vol. 1

History of the Communist Party of Great Britain: Formation and Early Years, 1919-1924 - Vol. 1

History of the Communist Party of Great Britain: Formation and Early Years, 1919-1924 - Vol. 1

History of the Communist Party of Great Britain: Formation and Early Years, 1919-1924 - Vol. 1

Synopsis

This first in the six volume series covers the early 20s - the wave of post-war militancy, the negotiations between Marxist groups which led to the formation of the Communist Party, the Party's early organisation and political policies, and the coming into office and the fall of the First Labour Government.

Excerpt

This first volume of the History of the Communist Party of Great Britain treats the period of foundation of the Party and its early struggles from 1920 to the end of 1924. Included, though not in the same detail, is a history of the foundation and early days of the Young Communist League, and of movements in which the Party played a major part, like the National Unemployed Workers’ Committee Movement and the National Minority Movement.

In this volume I have plunged directly into the negotiations in 1919– 1920 for the formation of a Communist Party. I am hoping, later, to prepare a volume dealing with the background to the formation of the Party, particularly with the period 1912–1920.

The second volume of this history which covers the period 1925– 1927 is already written and will appear under the title The General Strike, 1925–1927. It will contain a number of Appendices—on the Party’s publications, its successive leaderships, etc., which cover the period from 1920 to the beginning of 1927 and refer, therefore, to the first as well as to the second volume.

I shall be beginning in mid-1968, in co-operation with Jack Cohen, the third volume of this History. This will start with the 1927 period.

I have tried throughout the first two volumes to present the history of the Communist Party, not as something isolated, separate, in itself, but as part of, within the context of, the general Labour Movement. Treated as a cold succession of Congresses, Theses, Resolutions, the Party can never be understood, though this has been a method often favoured by those who write of the Party in order to belittle or condemn it. The Communist Party grew out of the working-class movement. It continued and developed the revolutionary traditions in the British Labour Movement. Its own internal development cannot be understood in isolation from the movement outside, any more than the impact of the Communist Party on the general movement can be understood without relation to its own internal development. The Party must be judged not only by its formal resolutions and statements, but by what it said and did in the struggles of the day, and in comparison . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.