Media, Profit, and Politics: Competing Priorities in an Open Society

Media, Profit, and Politics: Competing Priorities in an Open Society

Media, Profit, and Politics: Competing Priorities in an Open Society

Media, Profit, and Politics: Competing Priorities in an Open Society

Synopsis

"A compilation of essays and related commentary delivered at the second annual Kent State University Symposium on Democracy, Media, Profit, and Politics recognizes and considers the fundamental differences that arise when the competitive forces of commerce clash with the demand for the open availability of information in a democratic society. The conflicting roles of advocate-initiator and objective reporter for journalists who cover community politics, the role of the news media in forming public attitudes toward things political and their role in affecting voter nonparticipation, the role of financial considerations in the news media's attempt to provide citizens with needed news and perspective on political affairs, and particularly the role of the conglomeration of ownership of news-media organizations are a few of the major topics discussed in this timely volume." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Anyone concerned with the condition of democracy today must be familiar with the media of mass communication, for it is almost exclusively through mass media that we come to know what takes place in the world of politics. Indeed, it may not be an exaggeration to state that the mass media are, collectively, the environment within which politics is contested. For all intents, when considered from a public (democratic) perspective, if something hasn’t been reported in the media, it hasn’t happened.

Because the performance of the media has become inseparable from the practice of democracy in our society, it is all the more important that we understand the multifaceted relationships among politics, the mass media, and the force that increasingly drives both of them: money. Long past are the days when politicians could ignore or even treat with disdain the media that carry their messages to voters, constituents, interest groups, and other political actors.

This volume collects the papers and related commentary delivered at the second annual Kent State University Symposium on Democracy, held April 11–12, 2001. The Symposium was established by Dr. Carol Cartwright, president of Kent State University, to be an ongoing inquiry into the issues, practices, and concerns that arise when competing interests confront one another in democratic societies. The terrible conflict that can result from such a clash was inscribed on our memory on May 4, 1970, when four Kent State students were killed by national guardsmen who were on campus in response to student protests against the war in Vietnam. Since that historic day, the Kent State community has dedicated itself to a continual pattern of reflection on the meaning of the tragedy of May 4. That deliberation was formally recognized in May of 2000—the thirtieth anniversary of the shootings—by President Cartwright’s establishment of the Symposium series. The first Symposium, The . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.