Economic Growth, Poverty, and Household Welfare in Vietnam

Economic Growth, Poverty, and Household Welfare in Vietnam

Economic Growth, Poverty, and Household Welfare in Vietnam

Economic Growth, Poverty, and Household Welfare in Vietnam

Synopsis

In the 1970s and early 1980s, Vietnam's economic performance was dismal, and Vietnam was one of the poorest countries in the world. With the adoption of new market-oriented policies in the late 1980's, economic growth increased rapidly. Vietnam achieved an extremely high rate of economic growth in the 1990s, averaging 8% per year from 1990 to 2000. This economic growth was accompanied by a large reduction in poverty (reduced from 58% in 1993 to 37% in 1998), dramatic increases in school enrollment, and a rapid decrease in child malnutrition.'Economic Growth, Poverty, and Household Welfare in Vietnam' examines the causes of Vietnam's economic growth and its prospects for future growth. It also examines the impact of economic growth on poverty, school enrollment, child health, and a variety of other socio-economic outcomes. Finally, it examines the nature of poverty and the impact of government policies that attempt to reduce poverty.Based on unusually rich macroeconomic and household survey data from Vietnam, this book is an important resource for development practitioners, drawing lessons for Vietnam and for other low-income developing countries.

Excerpt

Vietnam’s economic and social achievements in the 1990s are nothing short of amazing, arguably placing it among the top two or three performers among all developing countries. This success demands serious study in order to draw lessons for other developing countries. Fortunately, there are high-quality data available to undertake such a study, and this book has made full use of those data, especially the 1992-93 and 1997-98 Vietnam Living Standards Surveys, to document and understand Vietnam’s experience and to provide policy recommendations for other low-income countries.

This volume offers a very broad array of studies of Vietnam’s economy and society in the 1990s. It begins with four chapters on Vietnam’s economic performance, each focusing on a different topic: macroeconomic growth, wage labor markets, household enterprises, and agriculture. Of course, economic growth can take many forms, with widely differing consequences for poverty reduction. The next three chapters focus on poverty reduction in the 1990s, examining the impact (or lack thereof) of various poverty programs, the spatial distribution of poverty, and poverty among ethnic minorities. The next five chapters examine health and education outcomes. Three chapters on health consider child survival, child nutrition, and use of health care services, and two chapters on education cover basic trends in enrollment and financing and the factors that determine school progress and academic achievement. The last three chapters examine topics of particular interest in Vietnam: child labor, economic mobility, and interhousehold transfers. As a whole, this book constitutes a comprehensive study of economic and social development in Vietnam in the 1990s.

The research presented in this book involves the collaboration of numerous individuals and organizations. The two Vietnam Living Standards Surveys used in the book were implemented by Vietnam’s General Statistical Office, with financing from the United Nations Development . . .

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