Changing Methodologies in TESOL

Changing Methodologies in TESOL

Changing Methodologies in TESOL

Changing Methodologies in TESOL

Synopsis

Introduces core concepts in methods and teaching approaches Covering core topics from vocabulary and grammar to teaching, writing speaking and listening, this textbook shows you how to link research to practice in TESOL methodology. It emphasises how current understandings have impacted on the language classroom worldwide and investigates the meaning of 'methods' and 'methodology' and the importance of these for the teacher: as well as the underlying assumptions and beliefs teachers bringto bear in their practice. By introducing you to language teaching approaches, you will explore the way these are influenced by developments in our understanding of language, learning technologies, learners, and their socio-cultural world.Three main areas in TESOL methods are covered: the impact of learner needs, context and culture on language, learning and teaching approaches; knowledge of language and its impact on methods, from the word to whole texts; and multiple literacies and competences for the modern world, including academic literacy and web literacy, socio-cultural and intercultural competence. The impact on teacher choices and methods of World Englishes, approaches to grammar, and learner development is also discussed. Each chapter illustrates core principles in practice using case studies of English teaching worldwide. Guided tasks, including article critique, case study analysis, and small-scale classroom research, prepare you to engage critically with research literature and use this analysis to inform your own practice.

Excerpt

This series of textbooks addresses a range of topics taught within TESOL programmes around the world. Each volume is designed to match a taught ‘core’ or ‘option’ course (identified by a survey of TESOL programmes worldwide) and could be adopted as a prescribed text. Other series and books have been aimed at Applied Linguistics students or language teachers in general, but this aims more specifically at students of ELT (English Language Teaching–the process of enabling the learning of English), with or without teaching experience.

The series is intended primarily for college and university students at third or fourth year undergraduate level, and graduates (pre- service or in- service) studying TESOL on Masters programmes and possibly some TESOL EdDs or Structured PhDs, all of whom need an introduction to the topics for their taught courses. It is also very suitable for new professionals and people starting out on a PhD, who could use the volumes for self- study. The readership level is introductory and the tone and approach of the volumes will appeal to both undergraduates and postgraduates.

This series answers a need for volumes with a special focus on intercultural awareness. It is aimed at programmes in countries where English is not the mother tongue, and in English- speaking countries where the majority of students come from countries where English is not the mother tongue, typical of TESOL programmes in the UK and Ireland, Canada and the US, Australia and New Zealand. This means that it takes into account physical and economic conditions in ELT classrooms round the world and a variety of socio- educational backgrounds. Each volume contains a number of tasks which include examples from classrooms around the world, encourage comparisons across cultures and address issues that apply to each student’s home context. Closely related to the intercultural awareness focus is a minor theme that runs throughout the series, and that is language analysis and description, and its applications to ELT. Intercultural awareness is indeed a complex concept and we aim to address it in a number of different ways. Taking examples from different cultural contexts is one, but we also plan to look at many other educationally relevant cultural dimensions such as sociolinguistic influences, gender issues, various learning traditions (e.g. collectivist vs individualistic), culturally determined language dimensions (e.g. politeness conventions). Taking examples from different cultural contexts is one . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.