Deleuze and Research Methodologies

Deleuze and Research Methodologies

Deleuze and Research Methodologies

Deleuze and Research Methodologies

Synopsis

Deleuzian thinking is having a significant impact on research practices in the Social Sciences, particularly because it breaks down the false divide between theory and practice. This book brings together international academics from a range of Social Science and Humanities disciplines to reflect on how Deleuze's philosophy is opening up and shaping methodologies and practices of empirical research.

Excerpt

Rebecca Coleman and Jessica Ringrose

It is widely acknowledged that Deleuze’s work is having a significant impact across different fields in the social sciences and humanities. Our aim in this book is to examine the ways in which Deleuzian thinking is inspiring empirical research practice. Deleuze’s work has typically been viewed as ‘high’ theory, and as a set of ideas that work in an abstract way but which have little relevance to ‘doing research’. For example, Deleuzian ideas have been explored in social, cultural and feminist theory (see for instance the other books published in the Deleuze Connections series) and in the fields of art, film and media studies (see for example Colman 2011; Munster 2006; O’Sullivan 2006). As such, there has tended to be a focus on textual modes of analysis, with the ‘practical’ dimensions of Deleuze’s philosophy and approach to the empirical largely neglected. However, it has recently become apparent that Deleuzian inspired empirical research in the social sciences is steadily growing (see as examples Hickey-Moody and Malins 2007; Masny and Cole 2011; Ollson 2009; Potts 2004; McCormack 2007; Latham and McCormack 2009; Tamboukou 2008; Jensen and Rödje 2009). Deleuze and Research Methodologies draws on and contributes to this movement. At the same time, it contributes to wider shifts in social science, which indicate the need for methodologies capable of attending to the social and cultural world as mobile (Buscher, Urry and Witchger 2010), messy (Law 2004), creative (Massumi 2002), changing and open-ended (Lury and Wakeford 2012), sensory and affective (Stewart 2007; Orr 2006; Pink 2009), and that account for the performativity of method; social science methodologies not only describe the worlds they observe but (at least in part) are in involved in the invention or creation of the world (Law and Urry 2004; Barad 2007).

Taking up these concurrent trends, the book begins from the position that Deleuze’s work, with its focus on becoming, affect, relationality . . .

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