François Laruelle's Philosophies of Difference: A Critical Introduction and Guide

François Laruelle's Philosophies of Difference: A Critical Introduction and Guide

François Laruelle's Philosophies of Difference: A Critical Introduction and Guide

François Laruelle's Philosophies of Difference: A Critical Introduction and Guide

Synopsis

Everything you need to understand both Laruelle's critique of difference and his project of non-philosophy Gilles Deleuze described Laruelle's thought as 'one of the most interesting undertakings of contemporary philosophy'. Now, Rocco Gangle - who translated Laruelle's philosophy into English - takes you through Laruelle's trailblazing book Philosophies of Difference, helping you to understand both Laruelle's critique of Difference and his project of non-philosophy, which has become one of the most intriguing avenues in contemporary thought. He explains the context within which Laruelle's thought developed and takes you through the challenging argument and conceptual scaffolding of 'Philosophies of Difference'.

Excerpt

What has philosophy done for you lately? Has it challenged you? Has it saved you? Has it become an instrument in your hands for challenging and saving others? Or has it used you merely to propagate itself? Has it tricked you? In this dance or friendship or war between you and philosophy, who leads and who follows? Are you philosophy’s subject or its object, its mirror or its image? Are you Master or Slave here; maker, tool or halffinished product? To be sure, such images and relations are just metaphors and not concepts, yet we cannot help but ask what metaphor or image would be appropriate to such questions. Are kosmos, physis, polis metaphors? For whom exactly and to what ends? In such matters, the choice of metaphor largely determines the stakes. What are the stakes between you and philosophy? Are these stakes themselves philosophical? Who decides this? Do you?

But perhaps it is not about you. Perhaps the world and its scattered Others need philosophy. Certainly there is the undeniable call of suffering, individual and collective, personal and historical. It is not difficult today to recite a litany of contemporary disaster and imminent catastrophe at global and not only global scales. This has been true for some time now, perhaps as long as human memory. To the real suffering of those who live and have lived in the world, philosophy promises justice or at least suggests intelligent compromise. Unavoidably, we pose again and again a naive and yet sophisticated question to philosophy: What can be done? Is this question itself already philosophical? The world seems at times to be missing philosophy in the way a problem misses its solution, lacks its . . .

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