Institutions in Global Distributive Justice

Institutions in Global Distributive Justice

Institutions in Global Distributive Justice

Institutions in Global Distributive Justice

Synopsis

The first systematic treatment of the role of institutions in cosmopolitan theories of distributive justice.

Defining an institution as a public system of rules that sets out positions, rights and duties, Andras Miklos uses a philosophical argument to analyse the roles that social, economic and political institutions play in conditioning the justification, scope and content of principles of justice. He critically evaluates a number of positions about the role of institutions in generating requirements of distributive justice and considers their implications for the scope - global or otherwise - of justice. He then develops a new theory about the role political and economic institutions play in determining the content of requirements of distributive justice and, in a cosmopolitan argument against statist positions, shows how they can affect the scope of application of these requirements.

Excerpt

Global justice is a relatively new topic in the history of political philosophy. a little over a decade ago, when I started working on problems of global justice, there were very few books available in this field, written by only a handful of theorists who were interested in this then marginal topic. Most works written on justice in political philosophy focused on domestic issues, namely how the state should treat its citizens. Recently, however, there has been an explosion of interest in questions related to global justice, with an increase in the number of scholarly works to match. This attention is fully justified, given the extreme level of global poverty and the vast inequalities between peoples living in the most affluent and in the poorest countries. We must ask what the responsibilities of wealthier societies are. Do they have any duty of justice to contribute to eradicating global poverty and reducing inequalities? If they do, what are its grounds? Can we apply globally the principles of justice we accept for the domestic domain? I seek to approach and answer these questions by discussing whether there are obligations of distributive justice that apply at the global level.

I should emphasise that this book is about global distributive justice, and it refers only occasionally to other international areas to which the concept of justice can be applied. Even though the concept of justice is used in a large and growing literature as well as in public discourse to evaluate a broad range of subjects both domestically and in the global domain, including justifications of warfare and standards for the conduct of war as well as civil and political liberties individuals are entitled to, my concern in this book is narrower. I am interested in what we can say about justice as it concerns the distribution of socio-economic goods at the global level. in particular, distributive justice concerns particularly stringent claims people have over relative or absolute shares of . . .

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