Exploring Patterns of Behaviour in Violent Jihadist Terrorists: An Analysis of Six Significant Terrorist Conspiracies in the UK

Exploring Patterns of Behaviour in Violent Jihadist Terrorists: An Analysis of Six Significant Terrorist Conspiracies in the UK

Exploring Patterns of Behaviour in Violent Jihadist Terrorists: An Analysis of Six Significant Terrorist Conspiracies in the UK

Exploring Patterns of Behaviour in Violent Jihadist Terrorists: An Analysis of Six Significant Terrorist Conspiracies in the UK

Excerpt

This report, prepared for and funded by the Airey Neave Trust, presents the results of research into the six terrorist groups/cells and their 38 core individuals who had taken part in the six most serious terrorist conspiracies and attacks in the UK between 2004 and 2007, all of which were driven by the ideology of violent Jihadism as espoused by Al Qaeda. In each case the terrorists successfully launched or unsuccessfully attempted an attack, or were arrested and convicted of conspiring to carry out a terrorist attack. exhibited any specific types of behaviour. The research provides a detailed examination of the behaviours exhibited by violent Jihadist groups/cells and the individuals within them in order to see if particular types of behaviour were present that could help to indicate their intentions.

The report should be of interest to government officials dealing with managing investment programs related to innovation and sustainable development, policymakers in the domain of technology policy, researchers studying the field of science and technology, and research and development centres in private companies.

All terrorist groups or cells intending to carry out an attack using an improvised explosive device (IED), irrespective of their motivation or cause, must plan and prepare for their act of terrorism. They must acquire or make explosives and a detonator, and devise and construct a means of initiating the explosion. If they cannot purchase or steal explosives, they must make their own from legitimately available materials. To carry out these tasks, they need to find premises in which they are safe and where their activities will not arouse suspicion. Once they have met these needs, they will require information in order to select a target and to plan the attack. They may need forged or fraudulent documents to gain access where it is denied to them and weapons to support the attack or prevent capture. They will also require somewhere to live (ideally away from the premises where they are constructing the IED), and the means to communicate with each other and to travel around. To finance all of these things, they need money.

Terrorist attacks involving the use of IEDs appear to conform to a cycle consisting of four broad phases, starting with planning, moving on to preparations, then implementation and finally escape. However, the increasing use by certain terrorist groups of suicide attacks has caused this cycle to alter. Suicide attacks still require planning and preparation, although with more specialised elements than before, while the attack itself can be implemented in a variety of different ways. Obviously, for the suicide attacker, no escape plan is required, but in the aftermath of this type of attack, the exploitation of its propaganda value is now far more sophisticated than just a claim of responsibility by the group or the release of a . . .

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