Mitigating Corruption in Government Security Forces: The Role of Institutions, Incentives, and Personnel Management in Mexico

Mitigating Corruption in Government Security Forces: The Role of Institutions, Incentives, and Personnel Management in Mexico

Mitigating Corruption in Government Security Forces: The Role of Institutions, Incentives, and Personnel Management in Mexico

Mitigating Corruption in Government Security Forces: The Role of Institutions, Incentives, and Personnel Management in Mexico

Synopsis

Mexico has undertaken reforms in recent years to professionalize its police. This report draws on the literature on corruption and personnel incentives and analyzes police reform in Mexico.It addresses the roots of corruption and the tools that could be used to mitigate it and provides an initial assessment of the reforms effectiveness. The results suggest some progress, though police corruption still remains high and more work is needed.

Excerpt

Corruption in the Mexican police forces is widely acknowledged and longstanding. the Mexican government has undertaken police reforms in recent years that have focused on professionalizing the Mexican police. Key components of these reforms have been changes in compensation and personnel policies as a way of creating a civil service for police personnel. Whether these reforms are the right ones or have helped are open questions.

In this report, we draw on the literature on corruption and personnel incentives and analyze household survey data and other information related to police reform in Mexico. the study’s objectives were to address questions about the roots of corruption and the tools that could be used to mitigate corruption, with a focus on compensation and personnel management policies. We also provide an initial assessment, based on available information, about the effectiveness of these policies. the report should be of interest to the broad policy and research communities concerned about police corruption in general and in Mexico specifically.

This report is a product of the rand Corporation’s continuing program of selfinitiated independent research. Support for such research is provided, in part, by donors and by the independent research and development provisions of RAND’s contracts for the operation of its U.S. Department of Defense federally funded research and development centers. the research was conducted jointly within the rand National Security Research Division (NSRD) and rand Infrastructure, Safety, and Environment (ISE).

Nsrd conducts research and analysis on defense and national security topics for the U.S. and allied defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence communities and foundations and other nongovernmental organizations that support defense and national security analysis.

For more information on the rand National Security Research Division, see http://www.rand.org/nsrd.html or contact the director (contact information is provided on the web page).

The mission of ise is to improve the development, operation, use, and protection of society’s essential physical assets and natural resources and to enhance the related social assets of safety and security of individuals in transit and in their workplaces and communities.

For more information on ise, see http://www.rand.org/ise.html or contact the director (contact information is provided on the web page).

Questions or comments about this report are welcome and can be addressed to Beth Asch (Beth_Asch@rand.org) or Nicholas Burger (Nicholas_Burger@rand.org).

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