Stray Dogs and Virtual Armies: Radicalization and Recruitment to Jihadist Terrorism in the United States since 9/11

Stray Dogs and Virtual Armies: Radicalization and Recruitment to Jihadist Terrorism in the United States since 9/11

Stray Dogs and Virtual Armies: Radicalization and Recruitment to Jihadist Terrorism in the United States since 9/11

Stray Dogs and Virtual Armies: Radicalization and Recruitment to Jihadist Terrorism in the United States since 9/11

Excerpt

In 2010, Brian Michael Jenkins, Senior Adviser to the President of the RAND Corporation, examined the phenomenon of homegrown terrorism in the United States and suggested some strategies for changing the approach to fighting terrorism as terrorism itself changes. That work is documented in Would-Be Warriors: Incidents of Jihadist Terrorist Radicalization in the United States Since September 11, 2001 (RAND Occasional Paper OP-292-RC, 2010).

As the nation observes the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Americans are mindful of the terrorist threat and wondering where the nation stands. In this new paper, Jenkins revisits the topic of homegrown terrorism, expands on his remarks about the current environment and domestic counterterrorist strategy, and updates the numbers and case descriptions to include all of 2010. The discussion should be of particular interest to local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities.

This publication results from the RAND Corporation’s Investment in People and Ideas program. Support for this program is provided, in part, by the generosity of RAND’s donors and by the fees earned on client-funded research.

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