How Schools Can Help Students Recover from Traumatic Experiences: A Tool-Kit for Supporting Long-Term Recovery

How Schools Can Help Students Recover from Traumatic Experiences: A Tool-Kit for Supporting Long-Term Recovery

How Schools Can Help Students Recover from Traumatic Experiences: A Tool-Kit for Supporting Long-Term Recovery

How Schools Can Help Students Recover from Traumatic Experiences: A Tool-Kit for Supporting Long-Term Recovery

Synopsis

This tool kit describes how trauma exposure impacts students' performance and behavior and provides a compendium of programs for schools to support the long-term recovery of traumatized students. It also compares the programs with one another.

Excerpt

This tool kit is designed for schools that want to help students recover from traumatic experiences such as natural disasters, exposure to violence, abuse or assault, terrorist incidents, and war and refugee experiences. It focuses on long-term recovery, as opposed to immediate disaster response.

To help schools choose an approach that suits their needs, the tool kit provides a compendium of programs for trauma recovery, classified by type of trauma (such as natural disaster or exposure to violence). Within each trauma category, we provide information that facilitates program comparisons across several dimensions, such as program goals, target population, mechanics of program delivery, implementation requirements, and evidence of effectiveness. We explain how to obtain each program’s manuals and other aids to implementation and also discuss sources of funding for school-based programs.

Developed after hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the United States in the fall of 2005, the tool kit was used as part of a research project aimed at helping students displaced by these natural disasters. It was subsequently revised to reflect lessons learned about the kind of information schools needed most and updated to include additional programs uncovered during the research project.

This research is part of the rand Corporation’s continuing program of self-initiated research, which is supported in part by donors and the independent research and development provisions of RAND’s contracts for the operation of its U.S. Department of Defense federally funded research and development centers. This research was conducted within rand Health under the auspices of the rand Gulf States Policy Institute (RGSPI).

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