The Muslim Brotherhood, Its Youth, and Implications for U.S. Engagement

The Muslim Brotherhood, Its Youth, and Implications for U.S. Engagement

The Muslim Brotherhood, Its Youth, and Implications for U.S. Engagement

The Muslim Brotherhood, Its Youth, and Implications for U.S. Engagement

Excerpt

This study is intended as a guide to help policymakers better understand who Muslim Brotherhood (MB) youth are, how generational divides challenge the Brotherhood, and how MB youth can be integrated into U.S. engagement efforts. The study is not intended as a broad treatment of the Brotherhood, an organization on which much has already been written. Instead, it addresses an important but understudied cohort within the Brotherhood: the youth wing that is estimated to comprise between 35–50 percent of the organization’s total membership. As Egypt grapples with a new reality in which youth have emerged as important agents of change, while at the same time remaining marginalized within party politics and formal institutions, the Muslim Brotherhood is just one of many organizations that will have to contend with this disconnect.

Given a lack of research addressing MB youth specifically, Chapter One of this study aims to fill that gap by providing an empirical treatment of exactly who Muslim Brotherhood youth are. It addresses the size of the MB youth cohort, their role in the January 25 Revolution, their representation within the Brotherhood’s organizational structure, and their contribution to the organization’s broader program. In addi-

Richard Mitchell, The Society of the Muslim Brothers, New York: Oxford University Press, 1969; Carrie Rosefsky Wickham, Mobilizing Islam: Religion, Activism, and Political Change in Egypt, New York: Columbia University Press, 2002; Hosam Tamam, Tahawwulāt al-Ikhwān al-Muslimūn, [Transformations of the Muslim Brotherhood], Madbuli, 2007; Khalil al-’Anani, al-Ikhwān al-Muslimūn fī Misr: Shaikhūkha Tusāri’ al-Zaman, [The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt: Old Age Fighting Time], Dar al-Shuruq, 2007; Nathan Brown, When Victory Is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics, Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2012.

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