Securing Rights for Victims: A Process Evaluation of the National Crime Victim Law Institute's Victims' Rights Clinics

Securing Rights for Victims: A Process Evaluation of the National Crime Victim Law Institute's Victims' Rights Clinics

Securing Rights for Victims: A Process Evaluation of the National Crime Victim Law Institute's Victims' Rights Clinics

Securing Rights for Victims: A Process Evaluation of the National Crime Victim Law Institute's Victims' Rights Clinics

Synopsis

This book discusses how some clinics have won significant gains at the appellate and federal court levels concerning victim standing, the rights to be consulted and heard, and the right to privacy. Some have won significant victories in gaining standing for victims and expanding the definition of particular rights. Others are enjoined in the battle. But all have raised awareness of victims' rights in the justice system.

Excerpt

This monograph describes a process evaluation conducted by the RAND Corporation and National Center for Victims of Crime of the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) state and federal victims’ rights clinics. The clinics were conceived as a response to the fact that, in spite of burgeoning victims’ rights legislation in all states, many victims still are not receiving the rights to which they are entitled under law. The NCVLI clinics were intended to promote awareness, education, and enforcement of crime victims’ rights in the criminaljustice system.

The National Institute of Justice’s (NIJ’s) evaluation plan proposed a two-part effort: a process evaluation that would be descriptive in nature, followed by an impact evaluation that would attempt to determine measurable benefits of the clinics. We interpreted this to mean an initial phase of work that would feature case studies of NCVLI and the eight clinics. The case studies of NCVLI and each of the eight clinics, presented in this monograph, examine the implementation process, the environments in which the clinics operate, problems encountered, and solutions. This monograph synthesizes commonalities of experiences among the eight clinics, as well as differences in their approaches and environments. During the course of the process evaluation, we also constructed a logic model to describe the goals

The original number was nine clinics, counting Arizona’s state and federal work as two separate clinics. However, the state and federal sides of Arizona’s Crime Victims’ Legal Assistance Project have since merged into a single clinic; hence, this monograph deals with eight clinics.

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