Troubled Partnership: U.S.-Turkish Relations in an Era of Global Geopolitical Change

Troubled Partnership: U.S.-Turkish Relations in an Era of Global Geopolitical Change

Troubled Partnership: U.S.-Turkish Relations in an Era of Global Geopolitical Change

Troubled Partnership: U.S.-Turkish Relations in an Era of Global Geopolitical Change

Synopsis

A strong security partnership with Turkey has been an important element of U.S. policy for the last five decades. However, in the last few years, U.S.-Turkish relations have seriously deteriorated, and today they are badly in need of repair. The arrival of a new administration in Washington presents an important opportunity to put Washington's relations with Ankara on a firmer footing. Turkey plays a critical role in four areas of increasing strategic importance to the United States: the Balkans, Central Asia and the Caucasus, the Middle East, and the Persian Gulf. In each of these areas, Ankara's cooperation is vital to achieving U.S. policy objectives.

Excerpt

With the end of the Cold War, many Turks feared that Turkey would lose its strategic significance in American eyes. These fears, however, have proven to be unfounded. Rather than decreasing, Turkey’s strategic significance has increased. Turkey stands at the nexus of four geographic areas of growing strategic importance in the post–Cold War era: the Balkans, the Middle East, the Caucasus/Central Asia, and the Persian Gulf region. in each of these areas, Turkey’s cooperation is critical for achieving U.S. policy goals.

However, in recent years—especially since 2003—U.S.- Turkish relations have undergone serious strains. Sharp differences over Iraq and the Kurdish issue have been compounded by differences over the Middle East, particularly relations with Iran, Iraq, and Syria. At the same time, Turkey has witnessed a sharp rise in anti-American sentiment. This monograph examines the causes of recent strains in the U.S.-Turkish security partnership and options for reducing these strains. It should be of interest to U.S. policymakers and other U.S. officials monitoring developments in Turkey and its neighborhood.

This research was sponsored by the Director of Operational Planning, Policy and Strategy, Regional Issues Directorate, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Operations, Plans and Requirements, Headquarters United States Air Force (AF/A5XX), and was conducted within the Strategy and Doctrine Program of rand Project air force as part

See Transatlantic Trends, Transatlantic Trends: Key Findings 2007, Washington, D.C.: German Marshall Fund of the United States, 2007, p. 21. See also Pew Global Attitudes Project, Global Unease with Major Powers, Pew Research Center, June 27, 2007.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.