Building the "Goodly Fellowship of Faith": A History of the Episcopal Church in Utah, 1867-1996

Building the "Goodly Fellowship of Faith": A History of the Episcopal Church in Utah, 1867-1996

Building the "Goodly Fellowship of Faith": A History of the Episcopal Church in Utah, 1867-1996

Building the "Goodly Fellowship of Faith": A History of the Episcopal Church in Utah, 1867-1996

Excerpt

The past does not repeat itself, but sometimes it rhymes.

—Mark Twain

The past draws us to it like a magnet, and a question many new church members soon ask is, “What is the history of the Episcopal Church in this place?” The obvious first response in Utah is to read the Reminiscences of a Missionary Bishop by Daniel S. Tuttle, the territory’s first missionary bishop, who arrived by stagecoach in July 1867. The Tuttle work is remarkable; the quality of its travel writing belongs with the best products of the nineteenth century, but the book is over a century old, and only parts of it are about Utah. Tuttle had a vast missionary district including Montana and Idaho, and in 1886 left Utah to become bishop of Missouri and, through seniority, presiding bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States from 1903 until his death in 1923. Abiel Leonard, Tuttle’s successor as bishop from 1888 to 1903, was a less colorful figure who worked hard and consolidated the gains of Tuttle’s time, and advanced them as means would allow.

Then came another commanding presence and gifted writer, Franklin Spencer Spalding, bishop from 1904 until his tragic death in September 1914. He was killed by a speeding motorist while crossing a Salt Lake City street at night. Spalding’s short book on Mormonism and extensive writings on Christian socialism made him a national figure. Spalding was also opposed to American participation in World War I. His successor, Paul Jones, 1914– 1918, was added to the Calendar of the Episcopal Church for his witness to peace during World War I.

Jones was a socialist and pacifist whom the leadership of St. Mark’s Cathedral parish and St. Paul’s parish sought to remove, with the support . . .

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