The Texas That Might Have Been: Sam Houston's Foes Write to Albert Sidney Johnston

The Texas That Might Have Been: Sam Houston's Foes Write to Albert Sidney Johnston

The Texas That Might Have Been: Sam Houston's Foes Write to Albert Sidney Johnston

The Texas That Might Have Been: Sam Houston's Foes Write to Albert Sidney Johnston

Synopsis

Although Sam Houston would eventually emerge as the dominant shaper of the developing Texas Republic's destiny, many visions competed for preeminence. One of Houston's sharpest critics, Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, is the subject of this fascinating edition of letters from the period.

Donald E. Willett offers new annotation and analysis to these letters from Johnston's colleagues, friends, and supporters--first collected and edited by contrarian scholar Margaret Swett Henson, but never before published.

Excerpt

On January 22, 2001, Texas lost one of its favorite daughters, Margaret Swett Henson. Margaret was a loving wife and devoted mother. She was also a gifted teacher, researcher, and author of historical works on early Texas. This gentle soul who loved all things Texan was a prolific writer who published twelve books in her lifetime. Her first work, Samuel May Williams, Early Texas Entrepreneur (1976), won the Summerfield G. Roberts Award for the best book on the Republic of Texas. Her 1988 book, Chambers County: a Pictorial History, won that year’s T. R. Fehrenbach Award from the Texas Historical Commission. At the time of her death Margaret was working on what she believed would be her magnum opus, a lengthy biography of Texas entrepreneur Thomas McKinney. the unfinished manuscript, along with her extensive research material on the topic, lies among her personal papers at the Texas Collection of the Rosenberg Library in Galveston.

Margaret’s work on Texas history did not go unnoticed. The Directory of American Scholars, Who’s Who in the South and Southwest, and The World Who’s Who of Women included her accomplishments in their publications. in 1986 the East Texas Historical Association named her a Fellow of that organization. the following year the oldest learned society in Texas, the Texas State Historical Association, also selected her as a Fellow. in 1997 Texas historians elected her president of this prestigious organization. At the time of her death many scholars considered Margaret Swett Henson the first lady of Texas history.

During the twentieth century Texas produced its fair share of noted historians. Scholars such as Herbert Bolton, Eugene C. Barker, Carlos E. Castañeda, Walter Prescott Webb, and T. R. Fehrenbach viewed Texas history as an epic . . .

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