Kath Williams: The Unions and the Fight for Equal Pay

Kath Williams: The Unions and the Fight for Equal Pay

Kath Williams: The Unions and the Fight for Equal Pay

Kath Williams: The Unions and the Fight for Equal Pay

Excerpt

For some years there has been serious concern for the rapid decline in interest young people have in History. Could it be that the usual historical depiction of static one-dimensional beings whose heads have been separated from their hearts is an underlying reason for this lost interest? All people have strengths and weaknesses and, depending on circumstances, are capable of performing heroic or cowardly deeds, but men wished to preserve an untarnished image and remain immortal for posterity, so they created history: a record of their deeds only.

Because there is more to life and living than is recorded in history books, the novel provided the place in literature where human experiences could be portrayed. In the anonymity of the novel men were safe, and all emotions, human frailties, weaknesses, illnesses and hang-ups could be recorded. History’s splitting of the human so as to preserve egos may be partly responsible for the present dilemma.

The recording of history, apart from being a collection of known facts, should, where possible, embrace a combined record of the hearts and heads of those involved. However, when adhering to this theory, difficulties arise in attempting to write a record of motivations, thoughts, feelings and pain . . .

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