Growing Stories from India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture

Growing Stories from India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture

Growing Stories from India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture

Growing Stories from India: Religion and the Fate of Agriculture

Excerpt

In June 2009, producers Robert Kenner and Eric Schlosser released the film Food, Inc. in theaters across the United States. That this movie, an indictment of the U.S. food industry, played in mainstream theaters demonstrates that many people believe that we must rethink and rebuild our food system. In October 2008, prior to the presidential election, the New York Times published a letter to the president-elect from Michael Pollan that explained why we need what he called a Farmer in Chief. Pollan detailed the steep social, health, and environmental costs of industrial agriculture and urged that we must “put the interests of America’s farmers, families, and communities ahead of the fast-food industry’s.” Perhaps the most dramatic change can be seen in the proliferation of farmers’ markets and demands for organic produce, to the extent that even Walmart carries organic lines. While we can attribute this growth to multiple factors, such as the perceived health benefits of organic produce and the desire to reduce our “footprint,” this growth of interest in organic food demonstrates a growing dissatisfaction with existing food choices and the search for alternatives. Articles detailing the proliferation of farmers’ markets and the miles traveled by our food appear almost weekly, and these stories acknowledge what many of us have recognized for some time: the costs of industrial agriculture to the environment, human health, animal suffering, and social equity are unbearable.

The environmental degradation, hunger, and social instability produced by industrial agriculture demand that we expand our ecological imagination to develop new paradigms for agricultural practice. Expanding the ecological imagination in an agricultural context means . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.