The Philosophy of David Cronenberg

The Philosophy of David Cronenberg

The Philosophy of David Cronenberg

The Philosophy of David Cronenberg

Excerpt

There can be no doubt that the widely renowned and influential Canadian filmmaker David Cronenberg (1943–) has produced a diverse contribution to modern cinema. With his propensity to create imagery that is at once disturbing and provocative, Cronenberg has come to mainstream prominence with a striking collection of films. There were the breakthrough shockers, like Shivers (1975) and Scanners (1981); subversive media critiques, like Videodrome (1983); and mainstream hits, like The Fly (1986), which were both horrifying and appealing in equal measure. These early films revealed Cronenberg’s pioneering employment of the concept of “body horror,” but perhaps more significantly, they raised an abundance of questions for critics and viewers alike.

In subsequent years, Cronenberg has continued to pose questions in his films, adapting supposedly unfilmable cult literature, such as William S. Burroughs’s Naked Lunch (1991) and J. G. Ballard’s Crash (1996). And even more recently, he has created perceptive and detailed depictions of the criminal underworld with his critically acclaimed A History of Violence (2005) and Eastern Promises (2007), which expose the conflicted psychology and morality of such lifestyles. For a long time regarded as a cult figure with a following predominantly among sci-fiand horror film fans, Cronenberg has now emerged as a major and commercially viable filmmaker, producing such recent mainstream successes, but he has always stayed true to the aim of making thought-provoking cinema.

A constant throughout these various endeavors, and a project that has remained at the heart of Cronenberg’s cinematic output, is a predilection to engage with philosophical questions about human beings and the world that they inhabit. There is evidently an interest in the physical human form, but there is also interest in human psychology. The seventeenth-century . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.