Homer Simpson Ponders Politics: Popular Culture as Political Theory

Homer Simpson Ponders Politics: Popular Culture as Political Theory

Homer Simpson Ponders Politics: Popular Culture as Political Theory

Homer Simpson Ponders Politics: Popular Culture as Political Theory

Excerpt

When people told themselves their past with stories, explained their present
with stories, foretold their future with stories; the best place by the fire
was kept for the storyteller.

The Storyteller (opening sequence)

In 1987 Jim Henson, most famous, of course, for his Muppets, created and produced the first installment of The Storyteller. Combining live acting and puppetry, Henson used this award-winning television series to recreate myth narratives from around the world and, in the process, remind audiences of all ages of the importance and power of the stories a society chooses to tell. In each episode, the Storyteller (in the first season played by John Hurt and in the second season by Michael Gambon) magically brought to life tales of German, Russian, Celtic, Norwegian, and Greek traditions, each one offering humanistic insights into questions of power, ethics, religious belief, tradition, social hierarchy, the individual, and the “other.” These tales, which had been told throughout time and across cultures, served as a means for dealing with the big questions that have long plagued communities of people: questions about truth, justice, freedom, equality, and ethics. And underneath the stories lay expressions of cultural values and frameworks for understanding the world and our place within it.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.