Short Stories from the Irish Renaissance: An Anthology

Short Stories from the Irish Renaissance: An Anthology

Short Stories from the Irish Renaissance: An Anthology

Short Stories from the Irish Renaissance: An Anthology

Synopsis

"This is a fine anthology of stories, and one that is sorely needed, at least until all or most of the work of early twentieth-century Irish writers of short fiction is reprinted."&-Studies in Short Fiction

Excerpt

The Irish Renaissance is a rich literary period. Extending approximately 1890-1930, it is an era well known for its innovations in poetry, in drama, and, if James Joyce is considered, in fiction. However, such qualification of the last genre is too often typically assumed, and there is sometimes a tendency to forget that it was during these years that the Irish short story was born—long before Joyce’s Dubliners was finally published in 1914. Joyce both grew out of and contributed significantly to a remarkable tradition of short-story writing. Besides gathering together most of the period’s finest stories, many of which are out of print, this anthology’s purpose is to create a context for Joyce’s work—to show clearly that he was not an isolated genius in the realm of the Irish short story—so that any study of the Irish short story’s origins will be facilitated. The number of quality Irish stories out of print is staggering.

Joyce long resented George Moore, the author almost universally acknowledged as the originator of the short story in Ireland. Modelled on Turgenev’s Sportsman’s Sketches (1852), Moore’s The Untilled Field (Gaelic 1902, English 1903) is considered the first modern collection of Irish short stories ever published, and this is certainly true if we think in terms of collections of discrete stories that make some attempt at thematic unity. Moore’s first efforts in establishing the genre came in Parnell and His Island (1887), a vicious and immature series of sketches that pillories both urban and rural Ireland. Taking the nineteenth-century naturalist writer’s approach, Moore mercilessly limned the worst and most degrading scenes he could, which gained him lasting enmity among his countrymen—of both the upper and lower classes. “Dublin” and “An Eviction,” each taken from this collection, are adequate examples included . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.