A Chronicle of Fear, Anger and Failure: The Bush Administration's War against Terror

A Chronicle of Fear, Anger and Failure: The Bush Administration's War against Terror

A Chronicle of Fear, Anger and Failure: The Bush Administration's War against Terror

A Chronicle of Fear, Anger and Failure: The Bush Administration's War against Terror

Synopsis

"William Pfaff is Walter Lippmann's authentic heir. Like Lippmann, he places the rush of events in historical and cultural perspective and writesabout them with lucidity and grace."- Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr."America's best foreign affairs columnist."- Ronald Steel, Lippmann's biographer.William Pfaff's "Reflections" on politics and contemporary history have appeared in The New Yorker since 1971. His column for the Paris-based International Herald Tribune is syndicated by the Los Angeles Times.

Excerpt

The defeat in Baghdad was given unspoken acknowledgement by President George W. Bush on Thursday, November 13, 2003, after consultation with his advisers and with Ambassador L. Paul Bremer, iii, who had been abruptly summoned to Washington.

The President said that the United States had decided to adopt a new plan to “encourage more Iraqis to assume more responsibility” in the process by which American Occupation authorities in Iraq intended to hand power over to an Iraqi government.

This process would be speeded up, he said, so as to be completed in June 2004. He accompanied his description of the new plan with renewed assurances of American determination to persevere in the struggle for stability, security and democracy in Iraq for as long as it takes, and of his government’s conviction of certain victory.

He nonetheless had revealed defeat. the capture of Saddam Hussein a few days later produced a bubble of optimism in Washington and at Coalition headquarters in Baghdad, but no change in the security situation. Saddam Hussein, it seemed, had ceased, even symbolically, to be a player in Iraq’s conflict.

The Bush administration’s original plan had envisaged the drafting of a new constitution by the U.S.-nominated Iraq Governing Council in collaboration with American authorities, with a referendum to follow. Then there would have been national elections for a new permanent government, and only after that, a formal hand-over of power. This methodical process was expected to take many months.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.