The Giants of Sales: What Dale Carnegie, John Patterson, Elmer Wheeler, and Joe Girard Can Teach You about Real Sales Success

The Giants of Sales: What Dale Carnegie, John Patterson, Elmer Wheeler, and Joe Girard Can Teach You about Real Sales Success

The Giants of Sales: What Dale Carnegie, John Patterson, Elmer Wheeler, and Joe Girard Can Teach You about Real Sales Success

The Giants of Sales: What Dale Carnegie, John Patterson, Elmer Wheeler, and Joe Girard Can Teach You about Real Sales Success

Synopsis

Sales theories come and sales theories go, but nothing beats learning from the original masters. The Giants of Sales introduces readers to the techniques developed by four legendary sales giants, and offers concrete examples of how they still work in the 21st century. The book reveals how:

• In his quest to sell a brand new product known as the cash register, John Henry Patterson came up with a repeatable sales process tailor-made for his own sales force

• Dale Carnegie taught people how to win friends and influence customers with powerful methods that still work

• Joe Girard, listed by Guinness as the world's greatest salesman, didn't just sell cars, he sold relationships…and developed a successful referral business

• Elmer Wheeler discovered fundamental truths about persuasion by testing thousands of sales pitches on millions of people, and achieved great success in the middle of the Great Depression

Part history and part how-to, The Giants of Sales gives readers practical, real-world techniques based on the time-tested wisdom of true sales masters.

Excerpt

If Freud was right that our birth is our destiny, then I was destined to be in sales. Both my father and my grandfather—my mother’s dad—were salesmen.

Grandpa covered a territory in Nevada for the Shupe-Williams candy company. The area he covered was broiling hot in the summer, mighty cold in the winter, and desolate all year round. I can vividly remember how Grandpa would load his sample cases into the trunk and take off in his Nash Rambler (no air conditioning, of course) to make his rounds for a week or more, stopping at small grocers, drugstores, gas stations, motels—anybody who might carry candy near the checkout counter or on the shelves. He had been covering that territory for years and years, and he would come home with wild stories of things he had seen or heard in the tiny gambling dens and ratty saloons along the way. Grandpa liked the people who were his customers, and apparently they liked him. They bought a lot of candy from him. When he finally retired, the company put a new man into his territory. He lasted about six weeks. The heat and the loneliness got to him. The next guy couldn’t stop gambling. The next one got himself into a mess at a brothel. It was a wild territory with some unique challenges, and it turned out that my grandfather—quiet, calm, a little shy, friendly and yet reserved, and persistent—had been uniquely suited to it.

Dad started out with Nabisco after the end of World War II. He had been a Marine, having enlisted well before the war started. When war was declared, he was a drill instructor at Camp Pendleton. Soon he was in combat. He was wounded at Guadalcanal, patched up in Hawaii, then sent back to lead a platoon of the Second Marine Division in the invasion of Tarawa. It was even bloodier action. Most of the men around him were killed. Some-

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