The Flooded Earth: Our Future in a World without Ice Caps

The Flooded Earth: Our Future in a World without Ice Caps

The Flooded Earth: Our Future in a World without Ice Caps

The Flooded Earth: Our Future in a World without Ice Caps

Excerpt

Miami, 2120 CE. Carbon dioxide at 800 ppm.

Miami had become an open city. It was also an island. Although to the north it was still contiguous with the vast peninsula that had been Florida, the flooding had cut off all freeway and railroad ties, while the airport itself was now a vast lake. All this was because the level of the world’s oceans had risen 10 feet. The reason for this vast geographic change—one that rendered every schoolchild’s world atlas obsolete—was readily apparent. Greenland was losing its ice cover.

Now, with waters sufficiently high to render assistance enormously expensive, the embattled U.S. government could no longer bear the costs of defending the drowned metropolis against the small-time tyrants who had risen to power amid decades of economic chaos, social displacement, and political breakdown. America was in a state of triage. The nation’s leaders had to decide which American coastal cities to fight for, and which to surrender to the rising waters. Miami did not make the list.

Nature was besieging the drowning city—the federal government could not afford to save a city like Miami, not with such a significant portion of the U.S. gross national product dedicated to building dikes for those urban areas of the eastern and western seaboards still somewhat less . . .

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