Sociology of Globalization: Cultures, Economies, and Politics

Sociology of Globalization: Cultures, Economies, and Politics

Sociology of Globalization: Cultures, Economies, and Politics

Sociology of Globalization: Cultures, Economies, and Politics

Synopsis

A rich collection of diverse voices, Sociology of Globalization examines the processes of globalization as well as its impact on people around the world. It looks beyond the headlines, stereotypes, and hype and features a balanced selection of classic scholarship and theory, cutting-edge research, and engaging journalism. Key pieces from prominent scholars, journalists, and theorists will resonate with students, stretch the classroom into their daily lives, and give the study of globalization concrete meaning. Each of three sections--culture, economy, and politics--begins with an original introduction from the editor which familiarizes readers with essential themes and concepts and provides necessary context for the readings that follow. Useful resources for further research, including websites, films, and class exercises, are also provided to exemplify and add relevance to major topics. Accessible and expansive, this is the ideal primary reader or supplement for undergraduate courses on the sociology of globalization.

Excerpt

When people talk about globalization, they are often talking about different things even though they use the same word. Globalization and the processes of globalization are widely discussed—and widely misunderstood. Sometimes people consider only the economic changes and processes. They forget that economics does not exist in a vacuum. Culture includes essential goods—music, movies, books, fashion, and art—that you enjoy daily and that would not exist without culture. Political changes facilitate the movement of goods and services across borders. Global capitalism—the internationalization of economies and corporations—is not the same as globalization. Like globalization, global capitalism is global in scale, but the processes of global capitalism are primarily economic. For instance, with global capitalism corporations now exist in many different countries and they also sell products in many different countries. Manufacture of products occurs in one country, with low tariffs, low taxation, and minimal regulations to protect workers or the environment. This manufacture can move to other places that offer better profits, because the company does not own the facilities but instead contracts work to factory owners.

Products may be altered so that the same product can be sold globally. The Walkman, a portable audio device that played cassette tapes or (later) compact discs, was reengineered to use a universal power source. This meant that Sony could manufacture a single product, making production more cost-effective. Advertising can also be universal, again saving costs and increasing profits. While traveling in China, I found iPod advertisements in Beijing that were . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.