The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions

The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions

The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions

The Invisible Arab: The Promise and Peril of the Arab Revolutions

Excerpt

They took everyone by surprise, including themselves. T-shirted youths filled public squares, cheered and sang, chanted and demonstrated peacefully, and, in the process, turned the tables on their violent regimes. People of other generations joined them—not as moderates or extremists, jihadists or atheists, Muslim or Christians, rich or poor, young or old, men or women, conservatives or liberals, but as citizens united for freedom and justice.

A long nightmare, shaped by political oppression, military defeats, social regression, and economic stagnation, finally gave way to a new dream of national unity, development, stability, legality, transparency, and accountability. Like Eastern Europeans, Latin Americans, and others before them, the Arabs at last took matters into their own hands.

Their long-held motto Insha’Allah or “God willing” was replaced with Masha’Allah or “God willed it.” “Down with the regime” overtook “Long live the leader.” Arabs offered their blood for the freedom of their homelands instead of sacrificing it for the leader whose praises they’d been forced to chant.

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