Penaid Nonproliferation: Hindering the Spread of Countermeasures against Ballistic Missile Defenses

Penaid Nonproliferation: Hindering the Spread of Countermeasures against Ballistic Missile Defenses

Penaid Nonproliferation: Hindering the Spread of Countermeasures against Ballistic Missile Defenses

Penaid Nonproliferation: Hindering the Spread of Countermeasures against Ballistic Missile Defenses

Excerpt

The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) becomes a greater threat when accompanied by the proliferation of effective means of delivery. Proliferator nations are acquiring the means of delivery—most dramatically, ballistic missiles.

Defenses against ballistic missiles are accepted instruments for dealing with missile proliferation. Such defenses can help protect friends and allies from missile attack. The prospect of such protection can reduce the incentive for potential proliferators to acquire WMD and their ballistic missile delivery systems. Once proliferation has occurred, missile defenses can reduce the expected effects of proliferators’ forces and thus help deter aggression.

These benefits will be lost, or at least reduced, if proliferators can acquire effective countermeasures against missile defenses. Such countermeasures, when incorporated in an attacker’s missile, are known as penetration aids, referred to here as penaids. The subject of this documented briefing is an approach to hindering the proliferation of penaids.

This documented briefing was prepared in 2012–2013 under the Naval Postgraduate School research task “Penaid Nonproliferation: New Measures to Dissuade WMD Proliferation and Reinforce Deterrence.” It should be of interest to individuals and organizations concerned with missile defense and with missile and WMD nonproliferation.

This research was sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and conducted within the International Security and Defense Policy Center of the RAND National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Combatant Commands, the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community.

For more information on the International Security and Defense Policy Center, see http://www.rand.org/nsrd/ndri/centers/isdp.html or contact the director (contact information is provided on the web page).

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