Markets for Cybercrime Tools and Stolen Data: Hackers' Bazaar

Markets for Cybercrime Tools and Stolen Data: Hackers' Bazaar

Markets for Cybercrime Tools and Stolen Data: Hackers' Bazaar

Markets for Cybercrime Tools and Stolen Data: Hackers' Bazaar

Excerpt

Markets are good because they facilitate economic efciency, but when that efciency facilitates criminal activity, such “black markets” can be deemed harmful. Criminal activities in cyberspace are increasingly facilitated by burgeoning black markets in both the tools (e.g., exploit kits) and the take (e.g., credit card information). As with most things, intent is what can make something criminal or legitimate, and there are cases where goods or services can be used for altruistic or malicious purposes (e.g., bulletproof hosting and zero-day vulnerabilities).

This report describes the fundamental characteristics of these markets and how they have grown into their current state in order to give insight into how their existence can harm the information security environment. Understanding the current and predicted landscape for these markets lays the groundwork for follow-on exploration of options that could minimize the potentially harmful infuence these markets impart. This report assumes the reader has a basic understanding of the cyber, criminal, and economic domains, but includes a glossary to supplement any gaps.

This report should be of interest to cybersecurity, information security, and law enforcement communities. It was sponsored by Juniper Networks as part of a multiphase study on the future security environment.

This research was conducted within the Acquisition and Technology Policy (ATP) Center of the RAND National Security Research Division (NSRD). NSRD conducts research and analysis on defense and national security topics for the U.S. and allied defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence communities and foundations and other nongovernmental organizations that support defense and national security analysis.

For more information on the ATP Center, see http://www.rand.org/nsrd/ndri/centers/atp. html or contact the director (contact information is provided on the web page).

Comments or questions on this draft report should be addressed to the lead author, Lillian Ablon, at Lily_Ablon@rand.org, or the project leader, Martin Libicki, at Martin_Libicki@rand.org.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.