Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World: The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World: The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World: The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World: The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

Excerpt

We live in an era of rapid change, increasing interdependence, and unprecedented complexity. The global integration and disintegration of markets, shared environmental threats, unstable states, the massive migrations of people, and the ubiquity of new technologies represent a new metacontext challenging the institutions of nation-states the world over. The basic problems of the twenty-first century—including economic meltdowns, environmental degradation, deep poverty, and new health threats—are planetary in scope and cannot be contained, much less meaningfully addressed, by individual nation-states, no matter how strong or isolated. National sovereignty and local identities, powerful as they are, now abut with an equally obvious fact: we live in an ever more miniaturized world (see Sexton, this volume) that is whole and interdependent—either we take planetary challenges head on or together we will face the consequences.

At the dawn of this century, the rate and depth of global change are creating opportunities but also new and more difficult challenges for education at all levels (see Gregorian, this volume). Yet schooling systems remain generally reactive and slow to adapt to shifting economic, technological, demographic, and cultural terrains (Gardner 2004). These changing terrains require a new agenda for schooling that is simultaneously mindful of local and global processes. This demand for a new agenda emerges at a time when education has become a normative ideal all over the world: youth and their parents everywhere want more of formal education than ever before (see, inter alia, Dugger 2009; Cohen, Bloom, and Martin 2006; UNESCO 2005).

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