Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results

Synopsis

Research indicates that emotional intelligence (EI) accounts for an astonishing 70-80 percent of management success. Technical expertise just isn't enough anymore: project managers need strong interpersonal skills and the ability to recognize emotional cues in order to lead their teams to success.

Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers introduces readers to all facets of EI and shows how emotions can be leveraged to meet project goals. They'll learn how to:

• Set the tone and direction for the project • Communicate effectively • Motivate, inspire, and engage their team • Encourage flexibility and collaboration • Deal productively with stress, criticism, and change • Establish the kind of high morale that attracts top performers • And more

The second edition includes several expanded sections on self-awareness and self-management, as well as a new chapter on using EI to lead Agile Teams and a close look at Servant Leadership. Without the people skills necessary to lead effectively, even the most care fully orchestrated project can fall apart. This indispensable guide gives project managers the tools they need to create winning teams and get the job done right and on time.

Excerpt

“Do you have any idea how dangerous it is not to be in touch with your feelings?” This question was posed to me in the summer of 2001 by Rich, a therapist who has since become my career coach and mentor. His words stopped me in my tracks. Dangerous? That was a curious word choice. What could be dangerous about not being in touch with my feelings? I was thirtynine years old and had been a successful project manager (PM) for over seventeen years. I had a record of slow but steady career progression. I had been certified as a Project Management Professional (PMP) since 1995. I owned my own project management consulting business and lived, taught, and even breathed project management. No one had ever asked me about feelings before. No one had ever mentioned that there might be danger involved. What could be dangerous? What was so important about feelings?

Rich’s question resonated with me, but I wasn’t sure why. It didn’t feel dangerous to be out of touch with my emotions. However, I had a nagging sense that he saw or knew things that I didn’t. On some level I recognized that the way I approached work wasn’t always effective. Hard work did not always make the difference in the outcomes of the projects I managed. I wondered how others seemed to succeed with less effort. I also felt insecure about the lack of personal and professional relationships I had built, and I suspected that it was hurting me. As much as I wanted to deny that my career and relationship challenges might be related to my emotions, I began to suspect that Rich might be right.

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