Engaging Government Employees: Motivate and Inspire Your People to Achieve Superior Performance

Engaging Government Employees: Motivate and Inspire Your People to Achieve Superior Performance

Engaging Government Employees: Motivate and Inspire Your People to Achieve Superior Performance

Engaging Government Employees: Motivate and Inspire Your People to Achieve Superior Performance

Synopsis

Government employees face enormous challenges today, including being stigmatized as underworked and overpaid. At the same time, they're being asked to solve some of our toughest issues: unemployment, security, poverty, and education.

In Engaging Government Employees, Robert J. Lavigna gives managers the tools they need to leverage the talents of government's most important resource: its people. He shows them how to measure, nurture, and sustain the kind of authentic employee engagement that drives results. With over three decades of experience in public sector HR, he knows how to get team members passionate about the agency's mission, and committed to its success. Readers will learn:

• Why a highly engaged staff is 20 percent more productive • How to get employees to deliver "discretionary effort" • How to assess the level of engagement • Why free pizza and Coke every Friday is not a viable strategy • And more

Drawing on a wealth of empirical evidence, Engaging Government Employees rejects the typical, one-size-fits-all approach to motivation and shows how America's largest employer can apply the science of engagement to dramatically improve performance.

Excerpt

This is not an easy time to be employed in the public sector. Heated budget battles and rhetoric about the size, function, scope, and effectiveness of government have generated criticism not just of government but also of the public servants who deliver government services. Across the country—in Congress, state legislatures, city councils, political speeches and ads, the media, and elsewhere—government organizations and their employees are denigrated and stigmatized as underworked and overpaid.

In stark contrast, in the not-too-distant past, government service was a respected profession—described as a “noble calling” by President George H. W. Bush. The best and brightest across our nation aspired to make a difference by devoting their careers to public service, whether it was in Washington, DC, crafting national policies, or in their local communities, protecting their neighbors, teaching their children, or helping in countless other ways.

Sadly, opinion has changed, and the public no longer views government as a noble calling.

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