Exodus 1-18

Exodus 1-18

Exodus 1-18

Exodus 1-18

Synopsis

"More than twenty-five years in preparation, the present study provides a form-critical analysis of the first eighteen chapters of the book of Exodus. Dividing his discussion between the Exodus and Moses traditions and the wilderness traditions, Coats examines each unit of the text of Exodus in turn, showing how the units' internal structures reveal the genre and social setting in which the book was written and what that setting and genre mean for proper interpretation. Illuminating to scholars and students alike, this volume will open up a new perspective on this important section of Scripture." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The editors' foreword to this volume of the FOTL series does not repeat the essentially standardized forewords in volumes I, IX, X, XI, XIII, XIV, XVI, XIX, and XX published thus far. While the guidelines for the series expressed in those volumes remain unchanged and can be reviewed in them, three particular matters deserve to be addressed here. One concerns the much delayed appearance in the present volume of Professor George W. Coats's work on Exodus 1–18. The second, occasioned by this delay, concerns the continuing particular contribution of the FOTL series to exegetical work, especially in relation to other recent Old Testament commentaries. The third matter concerns the announcement of new contributors to the series.

First, the unusually long delay between the preparation of Professor Coats's commentary and its publication must be acknowledged. The delay is the result of the inability of both Coats and the Claremont office of coeditor Knierim to complete their respective parts earlier in the process. Professor Coats submitted a first draft in June 1972, a revised second draft in June 1977, and a revised third draft in October 1984. He did not delay the completion of his initial assignment. Indeed, the drafts of his part of the originally planned FOTL volume II, combining Coats's and Knierim's work on the book of Exodus, was far ahead of Knierim's part. For that reason, and because Coats's part is a sizable volume of its own, the publisher agreed to the publication of volume IIA, on Exodus 1–18, by Coats, followed by volume IIB, on Exodus 19– 40, by Knierim.

Nevertheless, Coats's drafts never contained the total extent of his assignment and were never ready for normal editorial work. Coats cannot be faulted for the limitations of his drafts. His name is internationally known as an author of many excellent scholarly works, including the typescript of this commentary. Less well known is the condition under which he had to work. According to his own words, at age seventeen he suffered a fractured skull, which resulted in perpetual physical impairment that could be kept under control only through a series of periodic surgeries whose effectiveness decreased as the decades passed on. This condition not only forced him into premature . . .

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