Empire of Thebes, or, Ages in Chaos Revisited

Empire of Thebes, or, Ages in Chaos Revisited

Empire of Thebes, or, Ages in Chaos Revisited

Empire of Thebes, or, Ages in Chaos Revisited

Excerpt

The work that follows represents the third volume of a general reconstruction of ancient history, Ages in Alignment. As the term suggests, the accepted chronology of ancient civilizations has hitherto been out of alignment, out of joint. Kingdoms, empires and individuals in the different regions and cultures of the ancient Near East have been set down in the history books in a chaotic order, with the result that kings in Israel, for example, who were contemporary with pharaohs of the Egyptian New Kingdom (18 and 19 Dynasties), have been placed centuries after those same pharaohs. Thus the “history” of the ancient East, found in the voluminous learned textbooks of the great libraries of the world, is a fiction.

Those with an interest in these things will know that the first person to identify this error was Immanuel Velikovsky who, beginning in 1952, sought to rectify the mistake with a series of books entitled Ages in Chaos. Volume 1 of Ages in Chaos was followed by Peoples of the Sea (1977) and Ramses II and His Time (1978). Velikovsky died before he could complete his goal, namely to spell out a complete reconstruction of ancient history, and several of his books, most notably The Assyrian Conquest and The Dark Ages of Greece, remain to this day unpublished (though these can now be viewed on the Internet archive housing his works).

The present series of books, Ages in Alignment, is, as its name suggests, directly inspired by Ages in Chaos and seeks to complete the work of reconstruction which commenced in 1952. Readers of my other books will know that whilst in general I agree with the main thrust of Velikovsky’s work, there are significant differences. Most importantly, Ages in Alignment calls for a much more radical shortening of ancient chronology than anything envisaged even by Velikovsky. It became clear to me that Velikovsky had been unable to complete the work of reconstruction because he had placed too much reliance on the Bible as a chronological measuring rod. Some of his works, such as Peoples of the Sea and (to . . .

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