Building the New Man: Eugenics, Racial Science and Genetics in Twentieth-Century Italy

Building the New Man: Eugenics, Racial Science and Genetics in Twentieth-Century Italy

Building the New Man: Eugenics, Racial Science and Genetics in Twentieth-Century Italy

Building the New Man: Eugenics, Racial Science and Genetics in Twentieth-Century Italy

Excerpt

Francis Galton's gospel was quickly spread around the world. In 1924, a report of the International Commission of Eugenics published in Eugenical News listed fifteen countries in which eugenics had assumed an institutional form: England, Germany, the United States, Italy, France, Belgium, Switzerland, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Czechoslovakia, Norway, Argentina, Cuba and Russia; countries that were cooperating with the International Commission included Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, Australia and New Zealand. In the same year, a bibliography dedicated to eugenic issues already counted 7,500 titles, including monographs and articles.

It therefore seems most appropriate to approach eugenics as a cultural, social and political phenomenon with a broad international relevance. As Frank Dikötter put it, eugenics should be considered as [a fundamental aspect of some of the most important cultural and social movements of the twentieth century, intimately linked to ideologies of 'race,' nation and sex, inextricably meshed with population control, social hygiene, state hospitals, and the welfare state.] Initially focused on the cases of Great Britain, the United States and

Mark B. Adams, ed., The Wellborn Science: Eugenics in Germany, France, Brazil and Russia (New York: Oxford
University Press, 1990), 5.

Samuel J. Holmes, A Bibliography of Eugenics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1924).

Frank Dikötter, [Race Culture: Recent perspectives on the history of eugenics,] The American Historical Re
view
103, no. 2 (April 1998): 467. See also Marius Turda, [New Perspectives on Race and Eugenics,] Histor
ical Journal 51, no. 4 (2008): 1115-24.

Publications on eugenics in Great Britain and United States are too numerous to list here exhaustively. See,
in particular, Lindsay Andrew Farrall, The Origins and Growth of the English Eugenics Movement 1865-1925
(New York: Garland Pub., 1965); Daniel J. Kevles, In the Name of Eugenics. Genetics and the Uses of Human
Heredity
, rev. ed. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1995); Richard A. Soloway, Demography and

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.