Arrested Adolescent Offenders: A Study of Delayed Transitions to Adulthood

Arrested Adolescent Offenders: A Study of Delayed Transitions to Adulthood

Arrested Adolescent Offenders: A Study of Delayed Transitions to Adulthood

Arrested Adolescent Offenders: A Study of Delayed Transitions to Adulthood

Synopsis

Salvatore's work is one of the first studies to incorporate emerging adulthood into life course criminology. He explores how a new stage of the life course, identified as emerging adulthood influenced offending in a cohort of young people, finding that many of the key indicators of emerging adulthood such as economic instability are related to criminal offending and drug use for today's young adults. His findings support prior studies in life course criminology that social bonds and turning points are important factors in the offending patterns of youth.

Excerpt

The journey to adulthood has drastically changed in the United States and other developed nations over the last 50 years (Cote, 2000; Okimoto & Stegall, 1987). the transition period between adolescence and adulthood has become longer as marriage and parenthood, traditional markers of adulthood, have been postponed and many people have extended their education, training and self-exploration into their twenties (Arnett, 1998, 2000; Cote, 2000). This stage of the life course has been identified as emerging adulthood (Arnett, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006), a period lasting from about age 18 to 25- although for many it can extend through the twenties and thirties. Many in emerging adulthood have high rates of risky behavior and engage in acts of delinquency usually seen among adolescents. in this study, I examine how this new stage of the life course has had unique age and period effects on recent generations, influencing criminal offending by extending the active period for low-level offenders who traditionally peak earlier in the “age crime curve” and creating a new offender type, the arrested adolescent.

The age crime curve refers to the age distribution of crime. Benson (2002) described the age crime curve as having an inverse j pattern. the onset of criminality is typically around age 10, offending peaks between the ages of 15 and 19, and then gradually declines until about age 55 where the age-adjusted rate of criminality is close to zero.

Through an extensive program of research (Moffitt, 1993; Moffitt, Caspi, Rutter, & Silva, 2001; Moffitt, 2006), Moffitt has identified a developmental taxonomy that classifies several different types of offenders. One type is the “adolescent limited” (AL) offender, who commits low-level crimes during the teenage years (e.g., shoplifting, public disorder), and whose offending decreases as he “ages out” of . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.