Ideologically Motivated Murder: The Threat Posed by White Supremacist Groups

Ideologically Motivated Murder: The Threat Posed by White Supremacist Groups

Ideologically Motivated Murder: The Threat Posed by White Supremacist Groups

Ideologically Motivated Murder: The Threat Posed by White Supremacist Groups

Synopsis

Acts of terrorism committed by domestic extremists outnumber those committed by international actors. White supremacist groups are linked to a considerable number of these terrorist acts. Although part of the same movement, certain groups appear to pose a greater threat than others in that they are linked to a greater number of ideologically motivated homicides. Caspi investigated whether a group's location within its network accounted for this phenomenon. Interestingly, this preliminary study suggests that an association between network location and threat of extreme violence does exist. This finding may have important implications for those tasked with fighting terrorism.

Excerpt

In order to preserve our Christian heritage and race, it is our right,
our patriotic duty, to overthrow the Anti-Christ government.”

D. Ellison

Founder of Covenant, the Sword, and the Arm of
the Lord

Terrorism is on our minds. A quick review of recent polls confirms that Americans believe that the threat of international terrorism from extremist groups like al-Qaeda is real. However, Americans, and this includes law enforcement and policymakers, may be overlooking an equally realistic and grave threat - the domestic far-right. There is substantial evidence, both empirical and anecdotal, that domestic extremists pose as much of a terrorist threat as do foreign extremists.

Since the attacks on 9/11 academicians have taken a renewed interest in the study of terrorism and have been quite prolific. Unfortunately, for a variety of reasons, the vast majority of research in terrorism is not empirically based. Researchers have been attempting to overcome these limitations by developing more comprehensive databases and employing increasingly more sophisticated tools of analysis by which to analyze the data. One tool that has only recently been applied in the study of terrorism is social network analysis (SNA).

SNA is used to study networks (personal, organizational, etc.) in order to assess overall structure, as well as the location and role of participants within the network. SNA has been employed in a variety of . . .

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