Aggressive Driving: Insights Derived from Psychology's General Aggression Model

Aggressive Driving: Insights Derived from Psychology's General Aggression Model

Aggressive Driving: Insights Derived from Psychology's General Aggression Model

Aggressive Driving: Insights Derived from Psychology's General Aggression Model

Synopsis

Lin uses two separate studies with independent samples and different measures to explore how self-control personality traits ' sensation seeking, impulsivity, CFC, and anger/temper arousal ' relate to risky driving and aggressive driving within the framework of the GAM. He extends low self-control theory by demonstrating how the personality traits involved in this construct are associated with criminal/analogue deviant behaviors. The findings not only validate the meditational model of the GAM, but also imply that it could serve as a useful framework to study violent/property crime in future research.

Excerpt

Aggressive driving behavior is a serious problem in the U.S. and many other parts of the world. Since the late 1940’s numerous researchers have tried to understand why individuals engage in aggressive, and a majority of them come at the problem from a psychological perspective. While aggressive driving is a serious traffic offense, the subject has not been addressed very widely in the criminal justice literature. Most importantly, most of the limited studies undertaken in this area have not been couched within a comprehensive theory which could be tested against empirical evidence.

The present study attempts to understand aggressive driving viewed as a criminological issue, and it explores the utility of Gottfredson and Hirschi’s Self-Control Theory (1990) as applied within the framework of Psychology’s General Aggression Model (GAM, Anderson & Bushman, 2002). Two separate studies featuring independent samples and different but related measures are used to explore how four low self-control personality traits — sensation seeking, impulsivity, consideration of future consequences [CFC], and anger or temper arousal — relate to risky driving and aggressive driving within the framework of the GAM.

Results of both Study 1 and study 2 reveal similar evidence to support the research hypotheses: 1) sensation seeking, impulsivity, and CFC might be associated with aggressive driving through their possible relationships with temperamental personality (e.g., trait of temper arousal); 2) sensation seekers might create the situations (e.g., risky driving) for themselves to act aggressively; and 3) impulsive people and sensation seekers may become frustrated by different driving conditions . . .

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