Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

Intelligence-Led Policing: A Policing Innovation

Synopsis

After the attacks of September 11, 2001, American law enforcement was confronted with the reality that the mechanisms utilized by federal, state, and local police to share information across jurisdictions were inadequate. Intelligence-led policing is the emerging philosophy by which law enforcement can actively engage in information sharing to prevent or mitigate threats. There exists little empirical evidence as to how police organizations are implementing this new philosophy. Carter explores the innovative adoption of intelligence-led policing among American law enforcement and operationalizes what being "intelligence-led" actually constitutes. Recommendations for improving the adoption of intelligence-led policing by state and local police are provided.

Excerpt

In order for organizations to be successful they must adapt to their environment. The ways things have always been done must give way to the way things should be done. American law enforcement agencies are not immune to environmental demands, and are perhaps more susceptible to them than other social service agencies. The external environment of policing has evolved over time and in reaction to events. Traditional policing methods that were reactive to, and distant from, the community have given way to proactive methods that require routine police-community interaction. Crime has evolved from local drug trafficking and robbery to complex criminality such as displayed in inter-jurisdictional organized crime, identity theft, and threats of terrorism and radicalization. These external pressures, coupled with changes to the internal environment, require law enforcement administrators to incorporate a higher percentage of non-sworn employees and respond to increasing criminal, community and government demands with overall decreasing resources; these developments are forcing administrators to rely on analytic products more than ever.

Given the infancy of intelligence-led policing post-9/11, there is somewhat of a paucity of conceptual and empirical research to guide a study on its adoption. As will be discussed in detail, community policing and intelligence-led policing have conceptual commonalities that allow for the present study to be guided to a considerable degree by community policing research. Introduced approximately four decades ago, community policing became the new philosophical paradigm to which American law enforcement began to subscribe, gaining significant momentum in the 1980s. This philosophy integrated problem-solving, community partnerships and the flow of informal information to meet community demands as well as reduce actual and perceived crime. Along with the adoption of community policing came the challenge of successful implementation. Some police agencies labeled themselves as community policing agencies, but did so less to adopt to change than to secure external funding allotted for community policing initiatives. Consistent with institutional theory, other agencies . . .

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