The Egyptian Revolution: Between Hope and Despair: Mubarak to Morsi

The Egyptian Revolution: Between Hope and Despair: Mubarak to Morsi

The Egyptian Revolution: Between Hope and Despair: Mubarak to Morsi

The Egyptian Revolution: Between Hope and Despair: Mubarak to Morsi

Synopsis

This book offers a chronicle of, and a revealing look at, the 2011 Egyptian Revolution and its aftermath. The author, an Egyptian-American journalist living in Egypt, detailed the news coverage and man-in-the-street impressions of Mubarak's fall and Mohamed Morsi''s struggle to stay in power. At home in the U.S. as well as in Egypt, he uses his experience as a journalist to explain for Americans the confrontation between Islamists and seculars."

Excerpt

The more I travelled through the Middle East, the more I came to appreci
ate Egypt—the home to one of every four Arabs. For all its forgotten glory
and crippling economic problems, Egypt is very special. It is multilayered,
and the more you peel away, the more there is to discover. —DAVID
lamb, The Arabs: Journeys Beyond the Mirage (2002)

The year 2011 was epochal in the history of Egypt. No one expected a revolution to take place in the Land of the Nile, but it did. and it all played out at a breakneck speed like a video reel with the whole world watching. On Tuesday January 25 of that year, thousands of protesters poured into Tahrir (Arabic for “Liberation”) Square in central Cairo and in other major governorates across Egypt such as Alexandria, Suez, and Ismailia. On that day, which was a public holiday known as National Police Day, Egyptian demonstrators—many of them young people—launched the first salvo of an eighteen-day battle to topple Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, dissolve parliament, and draft a new constitution. Three protesters died in Suez, which is located in the north-eastern part of the country, and one policeman was killed in the Egyptian capital as a result of clashes between demonstrators and riot police. Washington and European states called on both the Mubarak government and demonstrators to exercise restraint, but clashes continued. By the time Mubarak stepped down from power on February 11, more than 300 Egyptians were reported dead or missing—though many at the time questioned the validity of such number. a government-established fact-finding commission stated on April 19 that the death toll was much higher: 846. More than 6,000 people were also reported injured.

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