Foreign Accents: Brazilian Readings of Shakespeare

Foreign Accents: Brazilian Readings of Shakespeare

Foreign Accents: Brazilian Readings of Shakespeare

Foreign Accents: Brazilian Readings of Shakespeare

Synopsis

Foreign Accents is formed of two parts: the first one offers analyses of translations/interpretations/appropriations of plays and sonnets in different processes of transmutation. The second part comprises texts that deal with more general critical readings. Shakespeare is viewed in the light of gender studies, of postmodernism, and of comparative studies.

Excerpt

Aimara da Cunha Resende

Brazil, nineteenth century. in rio, bourgeois houses were furnished and adorned with porcelain, pictures, and tapestry brought from Europe. Submissive women, considered part of their chauvinist husbands’ property, had tea or coffee in the afternoon among social gossip, read romantic novels, including, for instance, Jose de Alencar’s portrait of idealized Eurocentric Indians, or went with their husbands to the theater, where they would see plays imported from Europe, often performed by European companies, such as Ernesto Rossi’s and Tomaso Salvini’s. As stated by contemporary Latin American thinkers, such as Retamar, Vasconcelos, Rodo, Santiago, Bellei, and masterfully shown by Mário de Andrade in Macunaíma, Latin American history, including Brazilian, has been made of abrogation, of continuous loss of identity, traits explained by the center, the “civilized world,” as a desirable entrance into this very world.

When the colonizers came to Central and South America, they established here their view of human relationships, a capitalist determination of what was right and wrong. Discriminatory social relationships were essential for the maintenance of profit earned by the strongest, the idea of strength itself being the characteristic ability of the most capable according to their ethos: the capacity to destroy, both physically and intellectually. the natives—“savages,” to the Europeans—had to learn how to speak the conqueror’s language so as to assimilate his religion and his morals and, most of all, to accept the fact/fiction that theirs was an inferior position, and that they were slaves because they were unable to perform the same violent rituals of destruction or create arts/crafts of the kind found in Europe. Imitation was determined and determinant for the formation of identity of the New World. Caliban should speak Prospero’s . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.