Determined to Succeed? Performance versus Choice in Educational Attainment

Determined to Succeed? Performance versus Choice in Educational Attainment

Determined to Succeed? Performance versus Choice in Educational Attainment

Determined to Succeed? Performance versus Choice in Educational Attainment

Synopsis

In many countries, concern about socio-economic inequalities in educational attainment has focused on inequalities in test scores and grades. The presumption has been that the best way to reduce inequalities in educational outcomes is to reduce inequalities in performance. But is this presumption correct?

Determined to Succeed? is the first book to offer a comprehensive cross-national examination of the roles of performance and choice in generating inequalities in educational attainment. It combines in-depth studies by country specialists with chapters discussing more general empirical, methodological, and theoretical aspects of educational inequality. The aim is to investigate to what extent inequalities in educational attainment can be attributed to differences in academic performance between socio-economic groups, and to what extent they can be attributed to differences in the choices made by students from these groups. The contributors focus predominantly on inequalities related to parental class and parental education.

Excerpt

In many countries, concern about social-background inequalities in educational attainment has focused on inequalities in test scores and grades, with interventions including early-childhood education and low-cost child care being proposed as necessary to reduce such inequalities. The presumption behind these increasingly widespread interventions is that the best way to reduce inequalities in educational outcomes is to reduce inequalities in performance. But is this presumption correct? Is it possible that children from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely not just to perform well but also to proceed to higher levels of education even when they do perform well? Is part of the problem, in other words, the choices that these children are making? If it is, might it be more appropriate to focus on interventions that address such choices rather than those that focus solely on performance? The purpose of this book is to take on just such questions and to offer the first comprehensive cross-national examination of the roles of performance and choice in generating social-background inequalities in educational attainment.

This volume combines detailed analysis of educational transitions in different countries with general commentary on the roles of performance and choice in creating educational inequality. At the heart of the volume is a methodological approach that allows us to quantitatively assess the contributions of performance and choice. This approach is explained and developed early on in the volume and then applied throughout the balance of the book. The analyses based on this method are not of purely academic interest. By considering educational inequalities as the overall consequence of two separate processes (performance and choice), we do of course gain . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.