The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam

The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam

The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam

The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam

Synopsis

The Reconstruction of Religious Thought in Islam (1930) is Muhammad Iqbal's major philosophic work: a series of profound reflections on the perennial conflict among science, religion, and philosophy, culminating in new visions of the unity of human knowledge, of the human spirit, and of God. Iqbal's thought contributed significantly to the establishment of Pakistan, to the religious and political ideals of the Iranian Revolution, and to the survival of Muslim identity in parts of the former USSR. It now serves as new bridge between East and West and between Islam and the other Religions of the Book. With a new Introduction by Javed Majeed, this edition of The Reconstruction opens the teachings of Iqbal to the modern, Western reader. It will be essential reading for all those interested in Islamic intellectual history, the renewal of Islam in the modern world, and political theory of Islam's relationship to the West.

Excerpt

It is difficult to identify a thinker who integrates as many opposites in his person and in his ideas as Muhammad Iqbal (1877-1938). A juxtaposition of some of the opposites that he integrates would look like this:

He is among the last classical Persian and Urdu poets.

He is among the first modern Muslim philosophers.

He is considered the intellectual father of Pakistan.

One of his poems is among the national songs of India.

His Javed Namah is an expression of his love for Rumi.

His Payam-e-Mashriq is an expression of his love for Goethe.

The Turks honored him, giving him an honorary resting place
alongside Rumi in Konya.

The Germans honored him by naming a park after him in
Heidelberg.

He counted Rumi, Ibn Khaldun, Ghazali, Akbar Allahabadi
among his teachers.

He openly acknowledged his debt to Emerson, Whitehead,
Bergson, James, Royce.

The leading philosophers of his day counted him as one of their
own.

The leading mystics of his day counted him as one of their own.

His work demonstrates intimate knowledge of modern science
and Western philosophy.

He considered all his poetry and philosophy to be an exegesis of
the Qur’an.

Iqbal’s quest to build bridges and establish relationship between opposites embodies the spirit of Tawheed and is a major reason for his widespread popularity in the Muslim world. His Urdu poetry is known throughout the Indo-Pak subcontinent and his Persian . . .

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