University Expansion in a Changing Global Economy: Triumph of the BRICs?

University Expansion in a Changing Global Economy: Triumph of the BRICs?

University Expansion in a Changing Global Economy: Triumph of the BRICs?

University Expansion in a Changing Global Economy: Triumph of the BRICs?

Synopsis

This is a study of higher education in the world's four largest developing economies-Brazil, Russia, India, and China. Already important players globally, by mid-century, they are likely to be economic powerhouses. But whether they reach that level of development will depend in part on how successfully they create quality higher education that puts their labor forces at the cutting edge of the information society.

Using an empirical, comparative approach, this book develops a broad picture of the higher education system in each country in the context of both global and local forces. The authors offer insights into how differing socioeconomic and historic patterns of change and political contexts influence developments in higher education. In asking why each state takes the approach that it does, this work situates a discussion of university expansion and quality in the context of governments' educational policies and reflects on the larger struggles over social goals and the distribution of national resources.

Excerpt

This is a study of higher education expansion and quality in the world’s four largest developing economies— Brazil, Russia, India, and China—known as the bric countries. These four economies are already important players globally, but by mid-century, they are likely to be economic powerhouses (O’Neill, 2001). Whether they reach that level of development will depend partly on how successfully they create quality higher education that puts their labor forces at the cutting edge of the information society. It is difficult to imagine large economies reaching advanced stages of development in the twenty-first century without high levels of innovative, well-trained, socially oriented professionals.

How effectively the BRICs improve and expand universities also affects the developed countries. This is especially true of university education in technology fields of study, such as various types of electronic/communications engineering and computer science. Skilled engineers and scientists are essential to high-technology industries, and these industries are, in turn, important to economic development in the information age. If the BRICs can train large numbers of highly qualified engineers and scientists, the poles of technological innovation could shift away from the United States, Europe, and Japan or—at the least—become increasingly shared between these old centers and the new (Freeman, 2010).

For this reason, we place special focus in this study on the increase in enrollment of engineers and computer scientists. Further, the perceived and actual growth in demand for graduates with technical/professional skills has . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.