Maximizing the Triple Bottom Line through Spiritual Leadership

Maximizing the Triple Bottom Line through Spiritual Leadership

Maximizing the Triple Bottom Line through Spiritual Leadership

Maximizing the Triple Bottom Line through Spiritual Leadership

Synopsis

Maximizing the Triple Bottom Line through Spiritual Leadership draws on the emerging fields of workplace spirituality and spiritual leadership to teach leaders and their constituencies how to develop business models that address issues of ethical leadership, employee well-being, sustainability, and social responsibility without sacrificing profitability, growth, and other metrics of performance excellence.

While this text identifies and discusses the characteristics necessary to be a leader, its major focus is on leadership - engaging stakeholders and enabling groups of people to work together in the most meaningful ways. The authors offer real-world examples of for-profit and non-profit organizations that have spiritual leaders and which have implemented organizational spiritual leadership. These cases are based on over ten years of research, supported by the International Institute of Spiritual Leadership, that demonstrates the value of the Spiritual Leadership Balanced Scorecard Business Model presented in the book. "Pracademic" in its orientation, the book presents a general process and tools for implementing the model.

Excerpt

In 1965 Robert Ouimet bought J. René Ouimet Holding Inc. (OHI) and became president of a leading Canadian frozen- food processing company. Today OHI is Canada’s largest manufacturer of low- cost frozen dinners and entrées. From the beginning, Robert envisioned leading a company based on spiritual principles. This vision is the core management philosophy of OHI, and Robert Ouimet has demonstrated that his company can generate profits while simultaneously improving the lives of employees and the communities in which they operate— what has come to be called the Triple Bottom Line, with an integrated focus on people, planet, and profit (Mele and Corrales 2005).

However, before he could bring such unity to his company, Robert discovered that he needed to first find unity in himself. Since his childhood, he had carried with him a nagging, obsessive, and recurring sense of guilt about being a “privileged” person because of his father’s business success. Based on that sense of guilt and on his early working experiences, Robert became certain that there is an inner longing in every person’s heart, regardless of their spiritual or religious orientation, for the Infinite or the Absolute, and he felt compelled to make a difference in the way he did business (Ouimet 2009).

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