The Global Limits of Competition Law

The Global Limits of Competition Law

The Global Limits of Competition Law

The Global Limits of Competition Law

Synopsis

Over the last three decades, the field of antitrust law has grown increasingly prominent, and more than one hundred countries have enacted competition law statutes. As competition law expands to jurisdictions with very different economic, social, cultural, and institutional backgrounds, the debates over its usefulness have similarly evolved.

This book, the first in a new series on global competition law, critically assesses the importance of competition law, its development and modern practice, and the global limits that have emerged. This volume will be a key resource to both scholars and practitioners interested in antitrust, competition law, economics, business strategy, and administrative sciences.

Excerpt

The Global Limits of Competition Law is the first book in the Stanford University Press series Global Competition Law and Economics. the series is aimed at one of the most central questions to the study of competition law (known as antitrust in the United States)—how law, economics, and institutions respond to an increasingly global and interconnected antitrust community. Over time, the use of economic analysis in competition law has become the most important development globally in this area of law. the universalist concepts of economics might serve as a common vocabulary enhancing exchange and dialogue between various competition law systems, a sort of tertium comparationis or metalanguage facilitating any effort of comparative analysis. Yet, the same economic inputs do not always lead to similar legal outputs, as other variables may interfere, most notably institutional and cultural factors. It is therefore important to integrate the economic analysis of competition law into the broader economic, political, social, and institutional settings of each competition law system. Although there is some excellent comparative work in this area, we believe that a discussion of the interaction of all these factors from a global perspective has been lacking. Similar issues on the implementation and the scope of competition law come up in a number of jurisdictions. Too often policy makers merely reference the ready-made solutions adopted by more established competition law systems, such as the United States and the European Union, without due regard to local factors. This gap in the literature is particularly important in view of the expansion of competition law globally.

The aim of the series is to create a well-developed set of books that will address the broader context in this dynamic area of law and policy. Indeed, the geographic coverage of the competition law enterprise has expanded considerably during the last two decades. More than 120 countries have now enacted competition law statutes and many apply them regularly. Newspapers . . .

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