The Nexus of Economics, Security, and International Relations in East Asia

The Nexus of Economics, Security, and International Relations in East Asia

The Nexus of Economics, Security, and International Relations in East Asia

The Nexus of Economics, Security, and International Relations in East Asia

Synopsis

While, over the last 30 years, the global economy's center of gravity has shifted to East Asia, the region has remained surprisingly free of interstate military conflict. Yet this era of peace and growth has been punctuated by periodic reminders of enduring security problems in the region-from China's military modernization, to unresolved territorial disputes, to persistent tensions on the Korean peninsula.

This volume is one of the first to treat these issues of economics and security as interconnected rather than separate. Its authors-leading scholars from the U.S. and China-shed new light on this important nexus by applying insights from a rich variety of approaches to explore and explain the dynamics of a region whose importance for students of both international political economy and international security has grown dramatically. They show that both economic and security 'fundamentals' matter if one is to understand the reasons for, and evaluate the durability of, East Asia's recent peace and prosperity.

Excerpt

Avery Goldstein and Edward D. Mansfield

East asia has experienced more than three decades of peace and prosperity, a sharp contrast with the recurrent wars and lagging development that plagued much of the region during earlier eras. the last major military conflict, the Sino-Vietnamese War, ended in 1979. Although skirmishes between the antagonists were not completely extinguished until the 1980s, the year 1979 marked the beginning of a clear secular decline in militarized conflict that has continued through the present (see Figures 1.1 and 1.2). That year also marked the start of sweeping economic reforms initiated under Deng Xiaoping’s leadership in China. China’s reforms, however, were only the most widely publicized among various efforts at economic liberalization throughout the region since the late twentieth century. These policy shifts have enabled many East Asian countries to share in a newfound prosperity that had previously taken root in Japan and in the so-called four tigers. Yet this era of peace and growth has been punctuated by periodic reminders of enduring security problems in the region. Do these security problems pose a threat to East Asia’s record of economic success? Or do economic success and the greater levels of international economic cooperation that have accompanied it provide a foundation for political cooperation and the management of security problems? the contributors to this volume shed new light on these important questions.

Three broad approaches to thinking about economics and security in East Asia can be identified. One approach views the region’s growing economic . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.