Providing for National Security: A Comparative Analysis

Providing for National Security: A Comparative Analysis

Providing for National Security: A Comparative Analysis

Providing for National Security: A Comparative Analysis

Synopsis

Providing for National Security: A Comparative Analysis argues that the provision of national security has changed in the 21st century as a result of a variety of different pressures and threats. In this timely volume experts from both the academic and policy worlds present 13 different country case studies drawn from across the globe-including established and newer states, large and smaller states, those on the rise and those in apparent decline-to identify what these key players consider to be their national security priorities, how they go about providing national security, how they manage national security, and what role they see for their armed forces now and in the future. The book concludes that relative standing and the balance of power remains important to each state, and that all see an important role for armed forces in the future.

Excerpt

This volume follows on from our earlier project on The Future of Transatlantic Relations (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2011) and examines the burgeoning area of national security. Over the last decade or so, this area of public policy has received far greater prominence as policy-makers, think-tanks, and the academic community have sought to redefine security and consider new ways of providing for national security. The thirteen case studies contained within this volume individually and collectively provide a fascinating insight into the national security process and help show how factors such as culture, geography, and history play major parts in the policy process. Involving country experts has proven to be an extremely fruitful advantage in helping us to understand where individual states were coming from and often where they also aspired to head toward. For us, the comparative analysis provided insights that we were not expecting, particularly similarities between states that we had not seen as obvious comparators.

The editors would like to thank all the contributors to this volume for their willingness to draft and revisit each of their chapters, meet deadlines, and provide input in producing what we believe is an edited collection that provides some real insights. We would also like to thank Geoffrey Burn and his team at Stanford University Press. Their professionalism has meant that we have found, once again, their support and advice invaluable and the process of bringing an edited collection together relatively trouble-free.

Andrew M. Dorman, Oxford, England
Joyce P. Kaufman, Whittier, CA

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