Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business

Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business

Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business

Negotiating Genuinely: Being Yourself in Business

Synopsis

We often assume that strategic negotiation requires us to wall off vulnerable parts of ourselves and act rationally to win. But, what if you could just be you in business? Taking a positive approach, this brief distills years of research, teaching, and coaching into an integrated framework for negotiating genuinely.

One of the most fundamental and challenging battlegrounds in our work lives, negotiation calls on us to compete and cooperate to do our jobs well and achieve extraordinary results. But, the biggest challenge in a negotiation is to be strategic while also being real. Author Shirli Kopelman argues that this duality is both possible and powerful. In Negotiating Genuinely, she teaches readers how to reconcile the disparate hats that they wear in everyday life--with families, friends, and colleagues--bringing one "integral hat" to the negotiation table. Kopelman develops and shares techniques that illuminate this approach; exercises along the way help readers to negotiate more naturally, positively, and successfully.

Excerpt

We often assume that being a strategic negotiator implies calculated self-interest with a dose of inauthenticity, or walling off vulnerable parts of ourselves. in business, you might not consider the values and norms you espouse when interacting with family, enjoying leisure activities, or participating in community. To many, business interactions imply a game with its own rules, one grounded in economic frameworks of social exchange and widely variable in terms of how heavily it emphasizes strategic competition and cooperation. Rather than changing hats when you navigate different roles (businessperson, spouse, runner, volunteer), and wearing a distinct business hat, could you integrate hats? Grounded in a positive framework, this book distills years of research, teaching, and coaching into an integrated genuine approach.

Negotiation is perhaps the most challenging setting for a genuine approach. Inherently, negotiations are mixed-motive social interactions with cooperative and competitive implications for both task and relationship outcomes. On one hand, there are resources in the mix that can grow, not only be allocated. On the other, as people discuss value creation and value distribution, their behavior is part of the equation and there are reputational and long-term business consequences. Although there are many . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.