Survival Strategies for People on the Autism Spectrum

Survival Strategies for People on the Autism Spectrum

Survival Strategies for People on the Autism Spectrum

Survival Strategies for People on the Autism Spectrum

Synopsis

Marc Fleisher's new self-help guide for autistic teenagers and adults will help readers improve their quality of life and overcome many everyday challenges, be it through the development of independent living skills, building a more varied and fulfilling social life, or mastering a course in higher education and broadening one's opportunities for the future.Marc Fleisher speaks from first hand experience about the coping strategies he himself has had to learn - often the hard way. Written particularly for young people who are just beginning to become independent from their parents, perhaps living in their own home for the first time, this book shows how to approach apparent problems with hope and the expectation of an improved quality of life.Survival Strategies is an invaluable source of advice and reassurance for people with ASDs across a wide age range. Other readers such as relatives and friends of people on the autism spectrum, and professionals such as educators or therapists will find it provides a host of new insights.

Excerpt

This book represents my second publication on autism to be released, following my autobiography Making Sense of the Unfeasible, also published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers, in June 2003. Before I discuss the aims and layout of this book, a brief review of my former work is in order. For those readers amongst you who have already read my autobiography, this will serve to jog your memories of the key points in my life story; for others who have perhaps never heard of me, it will provide a general outline of the type of person who is writing. My autobiography attempted to explain not only actual physical occurrences at different stages of my life, but also my inner personal and mental feelings.

I was born on 3 May 1967 in Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk and lived in an average-sized family home in Pakenham with my mother and father and one sister, slightly older than me. in my early childhood years I often felt lonely and very isolated from other children of my age, and had virtually no interest in interaction with the others, preferring to withdraw into my own fantasy world of obsessions and rituals. When I was about five, my parents, who had not been able to pinpoint the nature of my difficulties, took me to see a young, inexperienced junior doctor, who promptly labelled me as mentally retarded and beyond hope of any progress. As a further blow a few years later, my only sister was tragically killed in a car crash while we were abroad. This served to intensify my acute anxiety about things greatly when I

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